Poppies for the fallen?

Poppies for the Fallen

Hello there.

Today is Remembrance Day, so I thought I would put together articles looking at Armistice Day from different perspectives.

Before I start with all the information, I thought I’d  add What we Remember by the Royal British Legion.

Probably one of the most well-known poems used for Remembrance Day is For the Fallen by Robert Lawrence Binyon. Here’s a stanza from the poem,

They shall grow not old, as we that are left grow old:
Age shall not weary them, nor the years condemn.
At the going down of the sun and in the morning
We will remember them.

Whether we agree with war or not, no one can deny that those who have fought for their country and who still fight today are brave and should be remembered.

Let me begin with a piece which is in contrast to the other articles I have included. Simon Jenkins of The Guardian states the case against remembrance memorials, as he believes that it’s time to move on and leave this type of commemoration behind.

Now, let me throw something else in the mix – white poppies.  The Metro’s article Where can I buy a white poppy and what do they stand for? explains the history behind them.

What do you think? Is Remembrance Day on the way out? Should red poppies be replaced?

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In other news…

In an article in the Dailly Mail, we are given a glimpse of the end of World War 2 in photos; the sheer relief is apparent.

Up until recently, many soldiers from the Commonwealth were not given any type of recognition. These soldiers from the Caribbean, Asia and Africa fought for a country which many thought of as the ‘Motherland.’

Black History Month, Forces Network tells the history of African Caribbean Troops and the part they played in the World Wars.  We now know how much progress has been made when we realise that in June of this year, the heroic soldiers’ contribution was acknowledged with a War Memorial in Windrush Square in Brixton.

For further reading see:

BBC WW2 People’s War

The Commonwealth Contribution

The Telegraph, in ‘Foreign soldiers who fought alongside the British in the First World War,’acknowledge the contribution of overseas soldiers yet cause controversy with the use of the term ‘foreign.’ Many see these soldiers as British as they were citizens of the British Empire.

Thanks for reading.

Take care,

Tricia

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