Do What You Love! (Part 3)

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Hi there,

Welcome to the penultimate article in the series of Do What You Love!

So we all know that love does not pay the rent, and from what you are about to read sometimes doing what you love does not either. However, I don’t think that we should abandon what we love, if there is no money in it.  Sometimes what we leave behind is more precious than a full bank account.

Do What You Love is not only about business, it’s leisure too. So for those living in the real world (who were previously with me on the campaign trail), I need you to suspend your disbelief for a while, or at least until the end of this Do What You Love jaunt through life.

Music plays a large part of most people’s lives and through various genres we develop our own soundtracks for our lives.  This week we discover that classical music is no different with beauty and sadness walking hand in hand.

I recently heard Jane Jones on Classic FM (www.classicfm.com/radio) talk about a time in Gustav Holst’s life when he was so poor that when he had to attend the Royal College of Music in London, he made the 100 mile walk by foot from his home in Cheltenham carrying his trombone.  For more about this and other short pieces with other famous names such as WagnerSibeliusDebussy and Elgar see, http://www.classical-music.com/article/15-penniless-composers.

This may not seem very inspiring to mention people doing what they love and ending up poor, but some of the composers lead good lives prior to dying paupers. Wagner and Debussy apparently had luxurious lifestyles.  However, I feel sorry Elgar and Sibelius who were poorly paid or received very little royalties from successful compositions.

I guess there is a two-fold lesson in there; enjoy your life while you can and of course make sure you know what you are getting into if you sign a contract.

The composers like us today may have gone through difficult times, but the soundtracks they wrote for their lives, were their legacy, and we can do the same. We cannot put a price tag on the impression we leave behind but if we are passionate about what we do, who knows what impact we may have on other people’s lives.

So where is the romance? Well, let me go back to a quote that I used in my Most Wonderful Time of the Year Series, where I mentioned Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night. Written in 1602 the full quote is:

‘If music be the food of love, play on; Give me excess of it, that, surfeiting, The appetite may sicken, and so die.’

According to phrases.org see, http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/195300.html, the main character Orsino wants to be submerged in music in the hope that it will cure his lovesickness for Olivia.

Nothing much has changed in hundreds of years as music and writing still go hand in hand as illustrated by Shakespeare who was a prolific playwright, poet and actor.   This leads us nicely into the final week, next week, where I will be introducing one of the main loves of my life – poetry!

If poetry is your thing and you are in Palmers Green on Saturday the 13th of February, there will be some poetry reading in the Community Room of Palmers Green Library at 2pm. See http://www.palmersgreencommunity.org.uk/pgc/ for more details.

I hope you will indulge me once again, as we saunter through Do What You Love!

 

Take Care,

 

Tricia

 

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